Monday, April 9, 2012
Oh, and one more thing: The United States and Somalia are the only two countries to have failed to ratify the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child. In 1995, when the United States signed the treaty, conservatives argued that it would allow children to sue their parents for mistreatment, and objected to a clause prohibiting capital punishment for minors. President Bill Clinton never submitted the treaty for ratification. In a 2008 debate, Obama said, “It’s embarrassing to find ourselves in the company of Somalia” and promised to “review” the decision. That review is apparently still pending. And it’s still embarrassing to find ourselves in the company of Somalia. The Wages of 9/11
The Wages of 9/11
As a candidate, Barack Obama insisted that the United States was paying a heavy reputational price for violating international standards of human rights. “We will again set an example for the world that the law is not subject to the whims of stubborn rulers, and that justice is not arbitrary,” he promised in one campaign speech. Obama is not, of course, responsible for the Supreme Court’s conservative majority, which carried the day on Florence. But he has not, with a few exceptions, changed the practices, or the underlying logic, that make the United States such an outlier in the West. Obama has not done nearly as much as he expected, and his supporters hoped, to restore the damage incurred by the Bush administration. This has been one of the great failures of his time in office.

The Wages of 9/11

As a candidate, Barack Obama insisted that the United States was paying a heavy reputational price for violating international standards of human rights. “We will again set an example for the world that the law is not subject to the whims of stubborn rulers, and that justice is not arbitrary,” he promised in one campaign speech. Obama is not, of course, responsible for the Supreme Court’s conservative majority, which carried the day on Florence. But he has not, with a few exceptions, changed the practices, or the underlying logic, that make the United States such an outlier in the West. Obama has not done nearly as much as he expected, and his supporters hoped, to restore the damage incurred by the Bush administration. This has been one of the great failures of his time in office.

Tuesday, December 20, 2011 Wednesday, August 24, 2011
Review from Foreign Affairs: 

The three distinguished editors of this collection have produced a balanced overview of the Obama administration’s Latin America policy. The volume describes the high hopes that Barack Obama’s election engendered throughout the region and skillfully lays out why the honeymoon is waning: although Obama has significantly altered U.S. policy in the region, the change has been less than Latin America (and these writers) would have liked. The chapters written by non-U.S. scholars are particularly lucid and should help readers understand why Latin Americans feel so disillusioned with the United States. The book eschews a hemisphere-wide grand strategy in favor of engagement on select issues, a more modest approach than one usually finds in books about U.S. policy. Even as policymakers in Washington confront unprecedented challenges to U.S. interests around the world, attempt to revive a sputtering U.S. economy, and brace themselves for the upcoming presidential election, they would do well to heed this book’s spot-on recommendations for U.S. policy toward the restless region to their south.

Review from Foreign Affairs

The three distinguished editors of this collection have produced a balanced overview of the Obama administration’s Latin America policy. The volume describes the high hopes that Barack Obama’s election engendered throughout the region and skillfully lays out why the honeymoon is waning: although Obama has significantly altered U.S. policy in the region, the change has been less than Latin America (and these writers) would have liked. The chapters written by non-U.S. scholars are particularly lucid and should help readers understand why Latin Americans feel so disillusioned with the United States. The book eschews a hemisphere-wide grand strategy in favor of engagement on select issues, a more modest approach than one usually finds in books about U.S. policy. Even as policymakers in Washington confront unprecedented challenges to U.S. interests around the world, attempt to revive a sputtering U.S. economy, and brace themselves for the upcoming presidential election, they would do well to heed this book’s spot-on recommendations for U.S. policy toward the restless region to their south.

Thursday, July 7, 2011 Monday, May 23, 2011
The president actually killed his pint! He gets my vote," said Christy O’Sullivan, an Irish government clerical worker taking a long lunch break to watch live TV footage of Obama’s visit. "He’s the first president I’ve actually seen drink the black stuff like he’s not ashamed of something.

Obama in jubilant Ireland: `I’ve come home’

And my little Irish-American liver swells with pride.

Tuesday, April 26, 2011 Tuesday, March 29, 2011
To brush aside America’s responsibility as a leader and — more profoundly — our responsibilities to our fellow human beings under such circumstances would have been a betrayal of who we are. Some nations may be able to turn a blind eye to atrocities in other countries. The United States of America is different. And as president, I refused to wait for the images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action. President Obama (read the full transcript of his speech here)
Sunday, January 30, 2011 Friday, January 21, 2011
Finally, I conveyed this message to the President: The US should lead by example. The US will have an impact on positive changes in China and elsewhere by respecting human rights and strengthening democracy at home and taking a global leadership in upholding human rights as the guiding principle of its foreign policy. When the US ends torture, protects free press, or makes healthcare affordable to everyone, those who promote human rights and speak out against abuses in hostile environments can hold their heads high and carry on their arduous struggle, often at great personal risk. What I Told Obama About Beijing’s Human Rights Problem
Wednesday, January 12, 2011
We may not be able to stop all evil in the world, but I know that how we treat one another is entirely up to us. President Obama (via brooklynmutt)
Thursday, January 6, 2011
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