Friday, September 6, 2013
It’s like even though we’re a superpower, we haven’t figured out yet we don’t actually have superpowers. But we just keep jumping out of the building thinking we’re gonna fly. Jon Stewart on US intervention in the Middle East [video]
Monday, August 22, 2011 Monday, June 20, 2011 Friday, May 20, 2011 Sunday, February 27, 2011 Monday, February 21, 2011
Dear right wing blogosphere and also Bill Maher: You can’t generalize about women’s position in Muslim countries based on a reprehensible mob attack on CBS reporter Lara Logan. Generalizing about a whole group of people based on a single incident is called “bigotry.” It is also a logical fallacy (for wingnuts challenged by six syllables in a row, that means, ‘when your brain doesn’t work right’) known as the ‘Hasty Generalization.’ Nobody seems to note that allegedly helpless Egyptian women were the ones who saved Logan, or that Anderson Cooper was also attacked.

Some other examples of reporters or celebrities being assaulted by crowds are here and here. Wingnuts, and also Bill Maher, who do not immediately make generalizations on these bases about large groups of Westerners are wusses.

Note to Muslim-hater Bill Maher, who should know better: It is not true that women cannot vote in 20 Muslim countries, and please stop generalizing about 1.5 billion Muslims based on the 22 million people in Wahhabi Saudi Arabia, the only place where women cannot drive and where men can vote (in municipal elections) but women cannot. It would be like generalizing from the Amish in Pennsylvania to all people of Christian heritage and wondering what is with Christianity and its fascination with horses and buggies.
Top Five Myths about the Middle East Protests
Sunday, February 6, 2011 Friday, February 4, 2011 Saturday, January 29, 2011
The oldest of three children, the son of an ambulance driver and a mother who makes spare cash selling olives from the family’s groves, Dhouibi spent one-third of his family’s monthly income of $210 each month for four years to earn a university degree. When the degree failed to land him a job, his parents doubled down and sent him to school for another two years, for a master’s in computer technology.

Now two years on the job market with no job, Dhouibi — polite, earnest, thoughtful, and fluent in three languages — spends his morning with other unemployed high school and college graduates at the stand-up tables in Sidi Bouzid’s Café Charlotte. He nurses a coffee, thanks to the change his mother gives him from her olive sales. He goes home for lunch, visits an Internet cafe in the afternoon, returns home for dinner, sleeps in a room with his brother, and wakes, hopeless, in the morning to do it all again.

“Imagine your life going on like this,” he said at the Café Charlotte, standing over the coffee that was the treat of his day. “Every day the same.”
The Arab World’s Youth Army
After so many years of political stagnation, we were left with choices between the bad and the worse,” said Fadel Shallak, a Lebanese writer and a former government minister. “Now there’s something happening in the Arab world. A collective voice is being heard again. Yearning for Respect, Arabs Find a Voice
Tuesday, January 18, 2011
The fall of authoritarian regimes tends to come as a surprise — a miscalculation by those in power of the scale of popular outrage; of the willingness of the citizenry to defy traditional methods of control; and, most importantly, of the willingness of the security forces to kill their compatriots in defense of the regime. Tunisia, if anything, will have put the likes of Egypt, Jordan and Syria on heightened alert over the dangers posed by widespread economic grievances, making them more likely to act early to defuse such tensions. Egyptian officials over the weekend reportedly spoke of raising subsidies on food prices to ease the burden on the poor, mindful of the danger it posed. And the security forces of Egypt, Jordan and Syria are arguably more aware than their Tunisian counterparts were that they’re sitting atop a powder keg.

Indeed, this week would be an opportune moment for key men in the security forces of the Arab autocracies to seek a pay raise. The key ingredient of last week’s turnabout in Tunisia was the security forces, or a significant part of them, who refused to fire on their fellow citizens to protect the ruling family. Authoritarian regimes are innately vulnerable once economic despair strips citizens of their fear of challenging those in power. When soldiers are sent onto the streets to fire on people they recognize as their neighbors, their loyalty is far from certain. And it was clear that in Tunisia, the officer class was ready to seek a new governing arrangement once the cronyism of the rulers had ignited a popular revolt. That scenario ought to give Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak pause if, as is widely assumed, the 82-year-old autocrat plans to install his son, Gamal, as his successor — a move that would break the authoritarian regime’s tradition of picking its leaders from within the senior ranks of the military.
Tunisia: No Domino Effect, but A U.S. Dilemma Over Arab Democracy
Friday, January 1, 2010 Thursday, August 13, 2009
itsthemusicpeople:

inothernews:
INNOCENCE DESPITE WAR Palestinian children from al-Samuni family play atop the rubble of a mosque that was destroyed during Israel’s offensive on the Gaza Strip earlier this year. (Photo: Mohammed Abed / AFP-Getty via the Chicago Tribune)

itsthemusicpeople:

inothernews:

INNOCENCE DESPITE WAR Palestinian children from al-Samuni family play atop the rubble of a mosque that was destroyed during Israel’s offensive on the Gaza Strip earlier this year. (Photo: Mohammed Abed / AFP-Getty via the Chicago Tribune)
Wednesday, August 12, 2009
Geography FAIL.
Of course it’s on Fox News.

Geography FAIL.

Of course it’s on Fox News.

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