Monday, January 27, 2014
What we’re fleeing is not homophobia,” she says. “What we are fleeing is a Kremlin-organized campaign…

What I think we need is not an athletic boycott of the Olympics, what we need is a political boycott of Vladimir Putin,” says Gessen. “We need to see him alone in the box during the Olympic Games.

“It needs to be communicated to Russia that it is a pariah for doing what it does.”

Activist Masha Gessen

Will the Sochi Olympics ease the plight of Russia’s gay people?

Tuesday, December 10, 2013
Classy.

Classy.

Monday, August 5, 2013 Monday, August 20, 2012 Tuesday, June 26, 2012
Many people in our world take a smorgasbord approach to the Bible, picking and choosing what suits them and their views without acknowledging that the Bible is an extremely complex and intricate concatenation of views, perspectives and ideas. There are millions of people in our world, for example, who suffer social estrangement because of their sexual orientation. Some of this social alienation originates among simpleminded Bible believers who insist that gay relationships are condemned in Scripture. As it turns out, that is a debated issue, one on which serious scholars disagree. But apart from that, this condemnation of gay relations “because the Bible condemns it” is a case of people choosing the accept the parts of the Bible they want to accept and ignoring everything else. The same books that condemn same-sex relations, for example, also require people to stone their children to death if they are disobedient, to execute anyone who does any work on Saturday or who eats pork chops, and to condemn anyone who wears a shirt made of two kinds of fabric. No special emphasis is placed on one of these laws over the others - they are all part of the biblical law. Yet, in parts of society, gay relations are condemned, while eating a ham sandwich during a lunch break on a Saturday is perfectly acceptable. God’s Problem: How the Bible Fails to Answer Our Most Important Questions - Why We Suffer
equalitopia:

Oreo posts photo of pride Oreo on Facebook, causes controversy
Oreo posted this image to their official Facebook Page in support of pride weekend, which caused some of their Facebook fans to speak up — both for and against it.
Join in the conversation!

equalitopia:

Oreo posts photo of pride Oreo on Facebook, causes controversy

Oreo posted this image to their official Facebook Page in support of pride weekend, which caused some of their Facebook fans to speak up — both for and against it.

Join in the conversation!

Sunday, June 3, 2012 Thursday, April 12, 2012 Monday, January 30, 2012 Thursday, June 30, 2011
haralambros:

rightsandhumanity:

Sign the petition. Outlaw LGBT discrimination in Turkey.

With all due respect, I think the various LGBTQI communities in Turkey can handle this themselves.  All of these petitions asking people in the west to meddle in the affairs of other countries are extremely problematic, and show that there are still plenty of people around that think that those poor, helpless people in third world or developing countries could never possibly succeed in demanding their rights on their terms without our help and guidance.  Somebody please correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t remember seeing a plea for help coming from Turkey asking others to interfere.  It’s one thing to support, it’s another to directly intervene.  Orientalism and imperialism at its finest.
We just helped legalize gay marriage in New York, why don’t we continue focus our attention on other issues THAT ARE STILL AFFECTING US OVER HERE?

It isn’t about meddling in the affairs of other countries, it’s an attempt to urge governments to ensure that their citizens are adequately protected. Given Turkey’s poor human rights record when it comes to protecting LGBT citizens, I don’t think it’s unreasonable that concerned citizens from other countries would feel the need to speak out in support of LGBT rights and welfare. 
This petition expresses support for an anti-discrimination law that was drawn up within the Turkish parliament. A proposed Turkish law. It does not attempt to push the laws of any Western country on the people of Turkey, it simply states that human rights activists around the world (as Amnesty International is an organization active in every region of the globe) support this proposed law and hope that the Turkish parliament passes it so that LGBT citizens will be more thoroughly protected. 
And yes, Turkish activists are doing quite a bit to protect themselves and push their government to improve the human rights record. But given that human rights activists within Turkey have been prosecuted for their work by the government and freedom of speech has often been stifled, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with the international community expressing support for increased rights.
Also: human rights violators throughout the world constantly rely on these arguments of “meddling”  to deflect criticism. And if a country isn’t to be held accountable for their human rights record, perhaps they shouldn’t commit themselves to international human rights laws as Turkey has. 
Human Rights in Turkey

haralambros:

rightsandhumanity:

Sign the petition. Outlaw LGBT discrimination in Turkey.

With all due respect, I think the various LGBTQI communities in Turkey can handle this themselves.  All of these petitions asking people in the west to meddle in the affairs of other countries are extremely problematic, and show that there are still plenty of people around that think that those poor, helpless people in third world or developing countries could never possibly succeed in demanding their rights on their terms without our help and guidance.  Somebody please correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t remember seeing a plea for help coming from Turkey asking others to interfere.  It’s one thing to support, it’s another to directly intervene.  Orientalism and imperialism at its finest.

We just helped legalize gay marriage in New York, why don’t we continue focus our attention on other issues THAT ARE STILL AFFECTING US OVER HERE?

It isn’t about meddling in the affairs of other countries, it’s an attempt to urge governments to ensure that their citizens are adequately protected. Given Turkey’s poor human rights record when it comes to protecting LGBT citizens, I don’t think it’s unreasonable that concerned citizens from other countries would feel the need to speak out in support of LGBT rights and welfare. 

This petition expresses support for an anti-discrimination law that was drawn up within the Turkish parliament. A proposed Turkish law. It does not attempt to push the laws of any Western country on the people of Turkey, it simply states that human rights activists around the world (as Amnesty International is an organization active in every region of the globe) support this proposed law and hope that the Turkish parliament passes it so that LGBT citizens will be more thoroughly protected. 

And yes, Turkish activists are doing quite a bit to protect themselves and push their government to improve the human rights record. But given that human rights activists within Turkey have been prosecuted for their work by the government and freedom of speech has often been stifled, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with the international community expressing support for increased rights.

Also: human rights violators throughout the world constantly rely on these arguments of “meddling”  to deflect criticism. And if a country isn’t to be held accountable for their human rights record, perhaps they shouldn’t commit themselves to international human rights laws as Turkey has. 

Human Rights in Turkey

Tuesday, June 14, 2011
As one of the very few people out of the closet in Syria, I can tell you it is not an easy road. Traditions stand in your way; your masculinity is brought into question on every corner and from every person. Honor killings, while usually targeting women rumored to be promiscuous, can also target any man rumored to be gay.

The threat of violence is real. My father once pulled a gun and pointed it at my face during a fight about my homosexuality. Eight years later, my relationship with my family is still strained; I have been living on my own since I was 17, and I’m monitored by my father during any conversation with my siblings to make sure I don’t spread the gayness around. The fictional Amina’s fictional father, who was so supportive of her lesbianism, is something I long for. It is something I dream of…

Listen to the sounds of the real struggle from real people. But don’t lose your trust with those trying to create a real movement in Syria’s LGBT community — we need your help now more than ever. Don’t let some dude pecking away at a keyboard in the dark in the comfort of his house in Scotland take your attention away from the real story.
The Dark Closet: Don’t let the Amina hoax distract attention from the plight of the real gay community in Syria
Wednesday, June 1, 2011 Thursday, May 19, 2011 Sunday, April 24, 2011 Friday, March 11, 2011

"Getting Out," a 60 minute documentary produced by the Refugee Law Project in collaboration with the Ugandan Civil Society Coalition on Human Rights & Constitutional Law, explores the reality that for many LGBTI Africans coming out to family and friends at home is not even an option. Before they can come out, they first have to get out. This means not only finding means to escape the political forces promoting homophobia at home, but also dealing with the hypocrisies and failings of asylum systems around the world. Filmed in Uganda, South Africa, Geneva, and London, with supporting footage from Malawi and Zimbabwe, "Getting Out" depicts the true stories of five individuals navigating their way through this complex issue.

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