Tuesday, May 13, 2014
standwithfreeiran:

My Son Shahram Ahmadi has been sentenced to death. He is 26 years old and has spent the last 6 years of his life in prison. I couldn’t stop the execution of his younger brother Bahram and had a heart attack when I heard the news. The Iranian government refuses to hand over Bahram’s body. Now I need your help to stop Shahram’s execution.

Bahram is on the right and Shahram is on the left in the picture above. 
We are Sunni and Kurd. My son Shahram like many other Sunni youths has been critical of how badly the Iranian government treats the Sunni minority. Security police arrested him in April 2009 on his way home from mosque in our town, Sanandaj. They shot, beat, and kicked my son in the face, breaking his nose and head. They took him to the Intelligence Bureau of Sanandaj and subjected him to severe torture including electric shocks and forced him to falsely confess to armed resistance. It took the authorities 10 months before they allowed us to see him.
My son’s trial was unfair. The authorities kept him in detention for 4 years before charging him. The first time they allowed him to talk to his attorney was on the day of his trial. His trial lasted less than 10 minutes. Judge Mohammad Moghiseh used his coerced confession, the only evidence against him, to declare him a mohareb (enemy of God). I have no doubt that my son would have been found innocent if he had received a fair trial.
Your support could save my son. In the past international pressure has been instrumental in protecting individuals who had been unfairly prosecuted in Iran. A recent example is Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani who in 2006 was sentenced to stoning. Due to international pressure her sentence was later reduced to 10 years in prison and in March of this year, the Iranian judiciary announced that she has been released.
Shahram is not the only one at risk. Dozens of other Kurds have been unfairly sentenced to death. Please help me save my son and the other Kurds’ lives by asking Iranian officials to halt their executions and grant them fair trials.
Sign the petition. Pass it on.

standwithfreeiran:

My Son Shahram Ahmadi has been sentenced to death. He is 26 years old and has spent the last 6 years of his life in prison. I couldn’t stop the execution of his younger brother Bahram and had a heart attack when I heard the news. The Iranian government refuses to hand over Bahram’s body. Now I need your help to stop Shahram’s execution.

Bahram is on the right and Shahram is on the left in the picture above. 

We are Sunni and Kurd. My son Shahram like many other Sunni youths has been critical of how badly the Iranian government treats the Sunni minority. Security police arrested him in April 2009 on his way home from mosque in our town, Sanandaj. They shot, beat, and kicked my son in the face, breaking his nose and head. They took him to the Intelligence Bureau of Sanandaj and subjected him to severe torture including electric shocks and forced him to falsely confess to armed resistance. It took the authorities 10 months before they allowed us to see him.

My son’s trial was unfair. The authorities kept him in detention for 4 years before charging him. The first time they allowed him to talk to his attorney was on the day of his trial. His trial lasted less than 10 minutes. Judge Mohammad Moghiseh used his coerced confession, the only evidence against him, to declare him a mohareb (enemy of God). I have no doubt that my son would have been found innocent if he had received a fair trial.

Your support could save my son. In the past international pressure has been instrumental in protecting individuals who had been unfairly prosecuted in Iran. A recent example is Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani who in 2006 was sentenced to stoning. Due to international pressure her sentence was later reduced to 10 years in prison and in March of this year, the Iranian judiciary announced that she has been released.

Shahram is not the only one at risk. Dozens of other Kurds have been unfairly sentenced to death. Please help me save my son and the other Kurds’ lives by asking Iranian officials to halt their executions and grant them fair trials.

Sign the petition. Pass it on.

Friday, December 13, 2013
selva:

What You Think They Call It Black Ops For?
 Robert Levinson of Florida went missing in Iran in 2007, and the Washington Post and the AP are out with stories today that might better explain why: He was working as a sort of rogue operator for the CIA at the time. Or more precisely, the retired FBI agent was working for a small team of CIA analysts who apparently didn’t fill in their superiors about what they were doing, which amounted to running unauthorized spy operations overseas, according to the two stories. The AP calls it “an extraordinary breach of the most basic CIA rules.”
After his disappearance, CIA officials said flatly that Levinson wasn’t working for the agency, but Levinson’s family uncovered emails between him and a CIA analyst named Anne Jablonksi, with whom he was friends. In one sent before his Iran trip, he asked about getting paid, and she told him to deal with her, not the CIA’s contract office. “Keep talk about the additional money among us girls,” she wrote. Jablonski has since left the agency and could face criminal charges, says the Post. As for Levinson, now 65, the last proof that he was alive came nearly three years ago. The best guess is that Iran is either holding him or knows where he is. The AP says it has held the story three times in recent years, but is publishing now because efforts to free Levinson have gone nowhere. It adds that his CIA affiliation is surely old news to his captors.
//other reports indicate his family was compensated with over $2M before his disappearance.

selva:

What You Think They Call It Black Ops For?

 Robert Levinson of Florida went missing in Iran in 2007, and the Washington Post and the AP are out with stories today that might better explain why: He was working as a sort of rogue operator for the CIA at the time. Or more precisely, the retired FBI agent was working for a small team of CIA analysts who apparently didn’t fill in their superiors about what they were doing, which amounted to running unauthorized spy operations overseas, according to the two stories. The AP calls it “an extraordinary breach of the most basic CIA rules.”

After his disappearance, CIA officials said flatly that Levinson wasn’t working for the agency, but Levinson’s family uncovered emails between him and a CIA analyst named Anne Jablonksi, with whom he was friends. In one sent before his Iran trip, he asked about getting paid, and she told him to deal with her, not the CIA’s contract office. “Keep talk about the additional money among us girls,” she wrote. Jablonski has since left the agency and could face criminal charges, says the Post. As for Levinson, now 65, the last proof that he was alive came nearly three years ago. The best guess is that Iran is either holding him or knows where he is. The AP says it has held the story three times in recent years, but is publishing now because efforts to free Levinson have gone nowhere. It adds that his CIA affiliation is surely old news to his captors.

//other reports indicate his family was compensated with over $2M before his disappearance.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013
Iran embassy bombing may be linked to Syrian war
…In the morning, a suicide bomber on a motorcycle detonated himself just outside Iran’s embassy gate. Moments later, a much larger car bomb exploded down the street. Most of those killed were innocent bystanders.
A little known extremist group with ties to al Qaeda — the Abdullah Azzam Brigades — claimed responsibility for the bombings. 
The group said the attack was in retaliation for Iran’s support of the Assad regime in neighboring Syria.
Read more…

Iran embassy bombing may be linked to Syrian war

…In the morning, a suicide bomber on a motorcycle detonated himself just outside Iran’s embassy gate. Moments later, a much larger car bomb exploded down the street. Most of those killed were innocent bystanders.

A little known extremist group with ties to al Qaeda — the Abdullah Azzam Brigades — claimed responsibility for the bombings.

The group said the attack was in retaliation for Iran’s support of the Assad regime in neighboring Syria.

Read more…

Tuesday, November 19, 2013 Monday, September 23, 2013 Saturday, June 23, 2012 Friday, March 2, 2012 Tuesday, January 31, 2012 Monday, January 9, 2012 Wednesday, January 4, 2012
International developments have also not been kind to Tehran’s ruling cabal. After marginalizing the reformists, the conservative factions of the Islamic regime are now engaged in a political fratricide. In the wake of uprisings in the Arab world, Iran’s popularity in the region has plummeted. The Syrian regime, Tehran’s sole regional ally, increasingly appears unable to resist the calls for change shaking the entire region. Even Iran’s former allies in the Non-Aligned Movement have repeatedly voted against Iran at the IAEA and the Security Council, perceiving Tehran’s nuclear quest as too controversial for the country to serve as the developing world’s standard-bearer. Nearly a decade since the advent of the nuclear crisis, Iran is internally divided, regionally diminished, and internationally isolated. Supreme Loser: Why Iran’s ayatollah-in-chief always gets it wrong
Sunday, November 20, 2011 Thursday, July 28, 2011
standwithfreeiran:

Tuesday, 19 July 2011, marks a Global Day of Action during which health professionals, scientists, and concerned citizens from around the world appeal to the Iranian authorities for the immediate and unconditional release of Dr. Arash Alaei.
Dr. Arash Alaei and his brother Dr. Kamiar Alaei are renowned HIV/AIDS physicians who were arrested in June 2008 and wrongfully convicted in January 2009 on charges of communicating with an enemy government. Their crime? Traveling to international AIDS and public health conferences and liaising with other health workers to find solutions to the HIV/AIDS pandemic.
In late 2010, Kamiar was released following 870 days in prison in Iran. Arash was sentenced to six years in prison and today remains behind bars in Evin Prison in Tehran after three long years.
Dr. Arash Alaei has worked tirelessly to address HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and addiction, and demonstrated unwavering dedication to helping improve the lives of his countrymen and women by protecting them from disease and death. He needs to be immediately released to again take up his life-saving work.
Your message will be delivered to the Supreme Leader of Iran, Ayatollah Sayed Ali Khamenei, and other Iranian officials, urging the Iranian authorities to unconditionally release Dr. Arash Alaei.
SIGN THE PETITION

standwithfreeiran:

Tuesday, 19 July 2011, marks a Global Day of Action during which health professionals, scientists, and concerned citizens from around the world appeal to the Iranian authorities for the immediate and unconditional release of Dr. Arash Alaei.

Dr. Arash Alaei and his brother Dr. Kamiar Alaei are renowned HIV/AIDS physicians who were arrested in June 2008 and wrongfully convicted in January 2009 on charges of communicating with an enemy government. Their crime? Traveling to international AIDS and public health conferences and liaising with other health workers to find solutions to the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

In late 2010, Kamiar was released following 870 days in prison in Iran. Arash was sentenced to six years in prison and today remains behind bars in Evin Prison in Tehran after three long years.

Dr. Arash Alaei has worked tirelessly to address HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and addiction, and demonstrated unwavering dedication to helping improve the lives of his countrymen and women by protecting them from disease and death. He needs to be immediately released to again take up his life-saving work.

Your message will be delivered to the Supreme Leader of Iran, Ayatollah Sayed Ali Khamenei, and other Iranian officials, urging the Iranian authorities to unconditionally release Dr. Arash Alaei.

SIGN THE PETITION

Monday, May 23, 2011
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