Sunday, February 23, 2014 Wednesday, August 21, 2013 Tuesday, February 28, 2012 Sunday, February 6, 2011
You diminish the memory and meaning of the Holocaust when you use it to discredit any individual or organisation you disagree with. That is what Fox News has done in recent weeks. 400 Rabbis and leaders of all main sects of Judaism in response to Glenn Beck’s frequent use of Holocaust imagery. (via videcormeum)

(Source: )

Sunday, January 30, 2011
Suitcases that belonged to people deported to Auschwitz. This photograph was taken after Soviet forces liberated the camp. Auschwitz, Poland, after January 1945. 
US Holocaust Memorial Museum

Suitcases that belonged to people deported to Auschwitz. This photograph was taken after Soviet forces liberated the camp. Auschwitz, Poland, after January 1945. 

US Holocaust Memorial Museum

Tuesday, November 9, 2010 Tuesday, September 7, 2010

As Tom Segev makes plain in his meticulous and forceful new biography, “Simon Wiesenthal: The Life and Legends,” his achievements were real even if his heroic aura was sometimes exaggerated. His work helped lead to the capture of Adolf Eichmann. He tracked down the policeman who arrested Anne Frank. He was resourceful, confident, indefatigable.
“He was involved in efforts to locate and prosecute hundreds of Nazi criminals and assisted in the conviction of dozens,” Mr. Segev writes. “His endeavors were remarkable, especially in view of the fact that after the defeat of the Third Reich, most of those involved in Nazi atrocities had gone unpunished. They had integrated themselves into the lives of their communities in Germany and Austria and other countries and were not called upon to answer for their crimes.”
Wiesenthal, himself a Holocaust survivor, was driven by an unslakable yearning for — as he titled one of his autobiographies — “Justice Not Vengeance.” He imagined meeting the Nazis’ victims in heaven and was determined to speak just four words to them: “I didn’t forget you.” According to Mr. Segev, that phrase was both his animating force and motto.

Book of the Times: Simon Wiesenthal, the Man Who Refused to Forget

As Tom Segev makes plain in his meticulous and forceful new biography, “Simon Wiesenthal: The Life and Legends,” his achievements were real even if his heroic aura was sometimes exaggerated. His work helped lead to the capture of Adolf Eichmann. He tracked down the policeman who arrested Anne Frank. He was resourceful, confident, indefatigable.

“He was involved in efforts to locate and prosecute hundreds of Nazi criminals and assisted in the conviction of dozens,” Mr. Segev writes. “His endeavors were remarkable, especially in view of the fact that after the defeat of the Third Reich, most of those involved in Nazi atrocities had gone unpunished. They had integrated themselves into the lives of their communities in Germany and Austria and other countries and were not called upon to answer for their crimes.”

Wiesenthal, himself a Holocaust survivor, was driven by an unslakable yearning for — as he titled one of his autobiographies — “Justice Not Vengeance.” He imagined meeting the Nazis’ victims in heaven and was determined to speak just four words to them: “I didn’t forget you.” According to Mr. Segev, that phrase was both his animating force and motto.

Book of the Times: Simon Wiesenthal, the Man Who Refused to Forget

Wednesday, July 7, 2010 Sunday, April 11, 2010

Remembering the Six Million

kohenari:

Today is Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Rememberance Day.

As we remember the six million Jews murdered by the Nazis, let us also recommit ourselves to fighting intolerance, injustice, and human rights abuses around the world.

Thursday, April 1, 2010
From the NY Times Lens Blog:
Mr. Nabrdalik, who is Polish, began this project because he felt he was part of the last generation that could approach Holocaust survivors.
“They are at the end of their life, which has been greatly influenced by everything that happened in the camps,” he said. “I didn’t want to lose more time. I treat these recollections as a testimony I am obliged to share.”
Click through to read the entire article and see more portraits.

From the NY Times Lens Blog:

Mr. Nabrdalik, who is Polish, began this project because he felt he was part of the last generation that could approach Holocaust survivors.

“They are at the end of their life, which has been greatly influenced by everything that happened in the camps,” he said. “I didn’t want to lose more time. I treat these recollections as a testimony I am obliged to share.”

Click through to read the entire article and see more portraits.

Saturday, January 30, 2010
A human being is not one thing among others; things determine each other, but man is ultimately self-determining. What he becomes - within the limits of endowment and environment- he has made out of himself. In the concentration camps, for example, in this living laboratory and on this testing ground, we watched and witnessed some of our comrades behave like swine while others behaved like saints. Man has both potentialities within himself; which one is actualized depends on decisions but not on conditions. Viktor E. Frankl
Wednesday, January 27, 2010
inothernews:

NEVER FORGET Survivors of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp gathered Wednesday at the site in Oswiecim, Poland, to mark the 65th anniversary of its liberation by Soviet troops. (Photo: Peter Andrews / Reuters via the Wall St. Journal)

inothernews:

NEVER FORGET Survivors of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp gathered Wednesday at the site in Oswiecim, Poland, to mark the 65th anniversary of its liberation by Soviet troops. (Photo: Peter Andrews / Reuters via the Wall St. Journal)

Wednesday, September 2, 2009
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looks at an aerial picture of the concentration camp Auschwitz at the headquarters of Axel Springer in Berlin. Netanyahu was given “The Auschwitz Plans”, original blueprints of the concentration camp Auschwitz by editor of the Bild daily Kai Diekmann. The plans will be transferred to the memorial site Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.

Nazi death camp blueprints given to Israel

BERLIN – Sketched on yellowing parchment, the 29 blueprints presented to Israel’s prime minister Thursday lay out the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz in chilling detail, with gas chambers, crematoria, delousing facilities and watch towers drawn to scale.
"There are those who deny that the Holocaust happened," Benjamin Netanyahu said as he accepted the documents as a gift to Israel’s Holocaust memorial, where they will go on display next year.
"Let them come to Jerusalem and look at these plans, these plans for the factory of death."
Netanyahu lingered over the large sheets spread on a table. Stamped with the Nazi abbreviation for concentration camp “K.L. Auschwitz,” one of the largest featured multi-colored sketches, with barracks and even latrines drawn in detail. Other smaller sheets showed architectural designs of individual buildings, drawn from various angles.
The Israeli leader was accompanied by his wife, Sara, whose father was the only member of his family to survive the Nazi genocide that killed 6 million Jews during the World War II. She watched somberly as the documents, which date from 1941 to 1943, were unfolded.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looks at an aerial picture of the concentration camp Auschwitz at the headquarters of Axel Springer in Berlin. Netanyahu was given “The Auschwitz Plans”, original blueprints of the concentration camp Auschwitz by editor of the Bild daily Kai Diekmann. The plans will be transferred to the memorial site Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.

Nazi death camp blueprints given to Israel

BERLIN – Sketched on yellowing parchment, the 29 blueprints presented to Israel’s prime minister Thursday lay out the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz in chilling detail, with gas chambers, crematoria, delousing facilities and watch towers drawn to scale.

"There are those who deny that the Holocaust happened," Benjamin Netanyahu said as he accepted the documents as a gift to Israel’s Holocaust memorial, where they will go on display next year.

"Let them come to Jerusalem and look at these plans, these plans for the factory of death."

Netanyahu lingered over the large sheets spread on a table. Stamped with the Nazi abbreviation for concentration camp “K.L. Auschwitz,” one of the largest featured multi-colored sketches, with barracks and even latrines drawn in detail. Other smaller sheets showed architectural designs of individual buildings, drawn from various angles.

The Israeli leader was accompanied by his wife, Sara, whose father was the only member of his family to survive the Nazi genocide that killed 6 million Jews during the World War II. She watched somberly as the documents, which date from 1941 to 1943, were unfolded.

Friday, June 5, 2009
apsies:

savingpaper:
President Obama listens to Buchenwald survivor Elie Wiesel at the memorial site for the “Kleines Lager” (Little Camp) inside Buchenwald concentration camp near Weimar, Germany.

 “Indifference, to me, is the epitome of evil.” — Elie Wiesel

apsies:

savingpaper:

President Obama listens to Buchenwald survivor Elie Wiesel at the memorial site for the “Kleines Lager” (Little Camp) inside Buchenwald concentration camp near Weimar, Germany.


“Indifference, to me, is the epitome of evil.” — Elie Wiesel

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