Thursday, January 30, 2014 Wednesday, January 29, 2014 Thursday, December 5, 2013
The United States still engages in active diplomacy with both China and Russia and other governments that have rights practices at odds with Washington.

Rice acknowledged the United States sometimes must strike a difficult balance.

“We make tough choices,” she said. “When rights are violated, we continue to advocate for their protection. But we cannot, and I will not, pretend that some short-term tradeoffs do not exist.”
Senior Obama adviser criticizes human rights abuses in China, Russia
Friday, November 15, 2013 Thursday, September 5, 2013 Tuesday, April 16, 2013

The bird-flu scare has hit the city at a bad time, with many citizens still distrustful of the authorities after the dumping in March of 16,000 dead pigs into tributaries of the Huangpu river. The government has still not said what killed the pigs, although it says it has found no trace of H7N9 in those tested for the virus. That the second H7N9 fatality was a pork butcher has done little to reassure the public.

Even in the official media, questions have been asked about why 27 days elapsed between the first death from H7N9 and its public announcement. The authorities say it took that long to confirm the cause, because the virus had never before been identified in humans. They have not explained, however, why on March 7th, three days after the first death, health officials in Shanghai denied rumours in social media that people had died of bird flu in a local hospital. One man was later proved to have died there of bird flu, along with one of his sons who was not found to have the virus. Despite official denials, suspicions remain that this could have been human-to-human transmission.

New Scare

A deadly outbreak of bird flu is testing China’s political leaders, as well as its response to health emergencies.

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 Monday, July 2, 2012
Pro-democracy protesters step on the mock Chinese PLA tanks after tens of thousands people march at a down town street during the annual pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong, July 1, 2012.
Mass Protests as Hong Kong Marks 15 Years of Chinese Rule

Pro-democracy protesters step on the mock Chinese PLA tanks after tens of thousands people march at a down town street during the annual pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong, July 1, 2012.

Mass Protests as Hong Kong Marks 15 Years of Chinese Rule

Monday, June 25, 2012
China is the world’s largest CO2 emitter and produces around a quarter of global carbon emissions. But according to the new study, which used more than a decade of official Chinese data, China’s carbon emissions could be 20% higher than previously thought. It says the emission discrepancy in 2010 is equivalent to about 5% of the total global output (in 2008). Warmed-up numbers: China may be severely under-reporting its carbon emissions
Wednesday, April 11, 2012 Friday, March 23, 2012 Monday, March 19, 2012 Tuesday, January 10, 2012
futurejournalismproject:

Foxconn Employees Threaten Mass Suicide
Foxconn, the world’s largest electronic component maker (think: Apple, Amazon, Nintendo, Dell, Panasonic… well, you get the point) is not a nice place to work. So rampant have the suicides been that last year the company made workers sign pledges not to kill themselves.
Via The Atlantic Wire:

As American consumers ogle over shiny new gadgets at this week’s Consumer Electronic’s Show, the workers that make those products are threatening mass suicide for the horrid working conditions at Foxconn. 300 employees who worked making the Xbox 360 stood at the edge of the factory building, about to jump, after their boss reneged on promised compensation, reports English news site Want China Times.  It’s not like this is the first time working conditions at Foxconn have made news outside China. But iPhone and Xbox sales surely haven’t lagged in the wake of those revelations and neither Apple nor Microsoft has done much of anything to fix things. 

As The Atlantic Wire points out, this week’s This American Life features a trip to a Foxconn factory in Shenzhen, China where approximately 350,000 to 450,000 people are employed.
You can listen to the episode here.
Image: Workers at Foxconn via China Southern Weekly

futurejournalismproject:

Foxconn Employees Threaten Mass Suicide

Foxconn, the world’s largest electronic component maker (think: Apple, Amazon, Nintendo, Dell, Panasonic… well, you get the point) is not a nice place to work. So rampant have the suicides been that last year the company made workers sign pledges not to kill themselves.

Via The Atlantic Wire:

As American consumers ogle over shiny new gadgets at this week’s Consumer Electronic’s Show, the workers that make those products are threatening mass suicide for the horrid working conditions at Foxconn. 300 employees who worked making the Xbox 360 stood at the edge of the factory building, about to jump, after their boss reneged on promised compensation, reports English news site Want China Times.  It’s not like this is the first time working conditions at Foxconn have made news outside China. But iPhone and Xbox sales surely haven’t lagged in the wake of those revelations and neither Apple nor Microsoft has done much of anything to fix things. 

As The Atlantic Wire points out, this week’s This American Life features a trip to a Foxconn factory in Shenzhen, China where approximately 350,000 to 450,000 people are employed.

You can listen to the episode here.

Image: Workers at Foxconn via China Southern Weekly

Monday, September 5, 2011
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